A Look Back in History: Stone Dam

Stone Dam, established in 1871, is located in the Pilarcitos Creek Watershed. It was built for the same purpose and about two miles downstream from Pilarcitos Dam. The purpose of both, to collect and send water to a thirsty San Francisco. The Dams were built by Spring Valley Water Company (known as Spring Valley Water…

SFPUC Retires the Boat and Grabs the Remote Control

A new footbridge to the gate house at Moccasin Reservoir means SFPUC staff no longer need to row a boat to the tower and crank a nearly 100-year-old gate valve by hand when they need to increase or decrease the amount of water in the reservoir. New upgrades will allow SFPUC staff to open and…

It is Tarantula Time in the Alameda Creek Watershed

September is the time when summer officially ends, and kids are back in school. In the SFPUC-owned lands of the Alameda Creek Watershed, September brings a different annual event: tarantula migration.  Because the 35,000 acres that the SFPUC owns are protected as a water source, they also provide a safe haven for all sorts of…

The Reason Why SFPUC Biologists Go Fishing

It is that time again. Time for the Trout Count. Biologists with the SFPUC have been working to estimate the total number of adult rainbow trout living in Calaveras Reservoir. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are a cold water species native to the rivers and lakes of North America. Like all native fishes, it’s important to…

The Power of Teamwork for the Powder Activated Carbon System

The task seemed impossible. Construct an entirely new Powder Activated Carbon water treatment system at the Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant that must be ready for service by the January 2019 Hetch Hetchy shutdown, while the Plant remained in operation. Why the rush? The SFPUC’s 2.7 million Bay Area customers would rely solely on local…

When Stinkwort Invades: SFPUC’s Early Detection and Rapid Response

It takes a team of committed professionals working together to take on the likes of an invasive, foul-smelling pest known as stinkwort. One of several high priority species of invasive weeds on the Peninsula and Alameda County, stinkwort, along with yellow starthistle, purple starthistle and artichoke thistle, are targeted for removal and control by the…