Toilets are Not a Dumping Ground

Just because a toilet has a lid on it like a trash can, does not mean one can throw anything they want into it. A friendly reminder from the SFPUC, only the “3 P’s” should take a splash. Pee, poop and toilet paper. The white throne, not a reference to the Game of Thrones, is…

Fish Getting Much Needed Help in the Alameda Creek Watershed

Protecting the quality of San Francisco’s drinking water starts with protecting the ecosystem and native wildlife around the SFPUC’s reservoirs and watersheds. To address that issue, the SFPUC built a state-of-the-art fish ladder in in the Alameda Creek Watershed, that will help monitor and protect the threatened species of steelhead trout. “We’ve been working on…

CleanPowerSF Announces Largest Commitment to Date in New Wind, Solar Projects

CleanPowerSF, the community choice renewable energy program operated by the SFPUC, is making significant investment in San Francisco’s clean energy future. The SFPUC has significantly expanded its commitment to new solar and wind projects in California. The developments, which will create more than 500 jobs and generate about 1 million megawatt-hours of renewable energy per…

Meet Biologist Tammy Egger, Who Has Multi-generational Ties with the SFPUC

As a Biologist in the Natural Resources and Lands Management Division, Tammy Egger plays an integral role in monitoring the quality of San Francisco’s drinking water. As a woman in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) field, she knows firsthand the importance of providing high-quality water to the SFPUC’s 2.7 million customers throughout the…

“Rushing” Native Plant Restoration at Lower Crystal Springs Dam

“This is a big deal for us,” said Mia Ingolia, SFPUC Senior Biologist. Like proud parents, SFPUC Natural Resources and Lands Management staff gazed down upon hundreds of newly-planted green shoots on the banks of San Mateo Creek. The adoration is absolutely deserved. These are the first plants grown at the Sunol Native Plant Nursery to…

Fowl Play: Wild Turkeys Flock and Waddle in the Watersheds

Often seen in flocks of five to fifty birds, wild turkeys are common in the SFPUC’s Alameda Creek and Peninsula watersheds, usually waddling slowly together in search of their next meal. The wild turkeys in the SFPUC’s watersheds, and occasionally wandering suburban streets, are not native to California. Most are descendants of farm-raised turkeys from…